Tag: Workship

Posted by Marilyn Cole 5 months ago

This is the final part in a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25.

‘Faith becomes deeply woven into the person you are at work, expressing itself in your thoughts, words, and activities, shining from the core of your identity’ (Martin, 2017, p.157).

There are many ways to build relationships in a workplace while contributing to the culture and climate. Mark Green from the London Institute of Contemporary Christianity has developed six M’s for how to integrate faith and work and Martin has turned these into the following questions.

Read more about ''Workship' - Relationships and Leadership'...

Posted by Marilyn Cole 5 months ago

This is Part Four of a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25.

'Because God is who he is, we cannot be indifferent when his truth and law are flouted, but because man is who he is, we cannot try to impose them by force' (Stott, 1984).

It seems intuitive to the believer that God intended through instruction in the Law to define morality, and to lead humankind to 'the right and the good' (Orr, 2007). However, today, the whole Christian ethic is under attack (Barclay, 1971). This challenge is coming not so much from other religions but from those out of the Judeo-Christian tradition who favour post-modernism. Some will go so far as to say there is no natural law or common morality. Each person's morality is of equal standing, since truth is relative and knowledge is really a matter of interpretation. Issues in the public arena are then said to be 'morally neutral' (Orr, 2007).

Read more about ''Workship' - Social Justice and Ethical Decision-Making'...

Posted by Marilyn Cole 5 months ago

This is Part Three of a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25.

'Our identity is not something that should fluctuate between jobs. It is something that needs to be fixed in something stable and unchanging' (Martin, 2017, p.131).

Educational psychologists Vander Zanden and Pace (1984) applied Erikson’s ideas in defining identity as: ‘the meaning one attaches to oneself as reflected in the answers one provides to the questions, “Who am I?” and, “Who am I to be?”’ (Lynda Kelly, 2010, p.74). It relates to self-image (one's mental model of oneself), self-esteem, and individuality. In short it relates to how I see myself and what gives me meaning. It includes how I am both similar to and different from others. A psychologist might describe identity in terms of the qualities, beliefs, personality, looks and/or expressions that make a person an individual, while sociologists may explain these characteristics as developing throughout a person’s life in response to family, culture social groups and other influential factors like education and work.

Read more about ''Workship' - Identity'...

Posted by Marilyn Cole 5 months ago

This is Part One of a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25.

'If we don't worship through our work we will either worship work itself, the money or status it brings or treat work as a mere means to the end of rest or a hedonistic retirement' (Gordon Preece in Martin, 2017, p.xv).

'Work in some form, paid or unpaid, is part of adult life. It is a fact of life. Ogden Nash says ‘If you don't want to work, you have to work so that you earn enough money so that you don't have to work’ (Martin, 2017, p.27).

While many know real fulfilment through their work, others experience the grind and demands of the daily work routine as more of a curse than a blessing. This is no surprise when we look at the origins of work in the Bible. From the creation we know that God worked and took delight in His work as a good thing. He worked for six of the seven days of creation. When man was made, he was made in the image of God and he too was invited to join in the work, to name the beasts and to work the ground. However, after disobeying God’s instructions, working the ground became onerous hard work.

 

Read more about ''Workship' - Introduction'...